Chief Sailors to Visit Brunei, Experience Culture > U.S. Indo-Pacific Command > 2015

MUARA, Brunei — The Avenger-class mine countermeasures ship USS Chief (MCM 14) arrived in Muara, Brunei, Feb. 15, for a port visit.

Chief is visiting Brunei while operating in U.S. 7th Fleet to strengthen regional security and stability, and enhance interoperability with partners.

“Port visits like this one are important because they emphasize not only our commitment to maintaining peace and stability in the region but, more so, our desire to strengthen and foster relationships with our partners and allies.” said Lt. Cmdr. Fred Crayton, commanding officer of Chief.

While in port Chief Sailors will have a chance to interact with Royal Brunei Navy sailors, explore the city, rainforests, beaches and take tours to exchange cultures and practices.

“I’m excited for this port visit,” said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Brandon Colin. “This is my first port visit to a foreign country and I want to sightsee and learn about their culture.”

Crayton also expressed what he wants the crew to gain while in Brunei.

“I want the Chief team to capitalize on any interaction with the Royal Brunei Navy to share knowledge and experiences,” said Crayton. “I want them to take advantage of all the wonderful culture Brunei has to offer while justly representing the United States.”

Chief, part of Mine Countermeasures Squadron 7, is operating in the Indo-Pacific region to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as a ready-response platform for contingency operations.

Chief is continuing a tradition of naval visits that began in 1845 when the famous sailing ship USS Constitution arrived in Brunei. Like the USS Salute which was destroyed when clearing mines from Brunei Bay in 1945 to help liberate Brunei, Chief is a minesweeper.

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Annual Force Protection Exercise Enhances, Tests Navy Readiness

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy’s largest annual force protection exercise, which included a real-world response, concluded Feb. 15.

 

During Exercise Citadel Shield-Solid Curtain 2019, all Navy installations in the continental United States used realistic training scenarios to ensure Navy security forces maintain a high level of readiness to respond to changing and dynamic threats. In Texas, those scenarios turned from training to reality.

At Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Navy security forces personnel responded to a vehicle that unlawfully entered the base Feb. 14; installation security personnel were already in an increased security posture. Personnel opened fire after the driver crashed his vehicle into a barrier and charged the personnel who were not injured during the incident. Emergency services pronounced the suspect deceased on the scene.

In addition to Exercise Citadel Shield-Solid Curtain testing installations’ readiness, the annual two-week force protection and anti-terrorism exercise also ensured seamless interoperability among Navy commands, other services and agency partners.

“We train as a team with local authorities to rapidly identify and respond to existing and emerging threats to our Navy installations, units, Sailors, our civilian shipmates and families,” said Adm. Christopher Grady, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFFC). USFFC co-leads the command post exercise with Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC), which leads the field training exercise Citadel Shield. 

In Maryland, Naval Support Activity (NSA) Annapolis partnered with Anne Arundel County, the City of Annapolis, Anne Arundel Medical Center and Baltimore Washington Medical Center to conduct an active shooter and mass casualty exercise on base Feb. 6. Navy security forces apprehended volunteers playing the role of active shooters. More than 40 additional volunteers playing wounded victims were transported to Anne Arundel Medical Center and Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. The volunteers playing victims were treated for their injuries by local emergency services.

“This

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Royal Marine and U.S. Marine generals strengthen rapport at MARFORCOM > The Official United States Marine Corps Public Website > News Display

By Master Sgt. Ryan O’Hare, Headquarters Marine Corps

The Commandant General Royal Marines, Maj. Gen. Charlie R. Stickland, visited U.S. Marine Corps Forces Command Feb. 12, 2019, to discuss future bilateral training opportunities with the Commanding General of MARFORCOM, Lt. Gen. Mark A. Brilakis.

The meeting was an opportunity for the two senior leaders to strengthen the long-standing rapport between the services while also speaking about current and future operational advantages gained from training together.

“It is a relationship built on both mutual experience and cooperation, in both peace time and conflict, and most importantly a shared set of values and capabilities,” said Brilakis. “The Marine Corps’, both Royal and United States, will maintain the ability to interoperate and rely upon each other.”

When discussing the significance of NATO joint training opportunities and exercises, such as Bold Alligator and Trident Juncture, Stickland emphasized the importance of always improving joint capabilities and readiness.

“As we develop both Royal Marine and Royal Navy capabilities with the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy, each time we undertake a NATO exercise we should seize them as an opportunity and as a building block to develop our capability, our interoperability, and our collective ability to project power,” said Stickland. “That’s why these NATO events are so key.”

Some of the advantages gained from training together include the sharing of tactics, techniques and procedures, and combining the experiences of each service to create a larger capacity and achieve mission success. Tartan Eagle, and annual exercise involving Marine Corps Security Force Regiment Marines training alongside British Royal Marine Protection Teams is an example of how sharpening skills and exchanging ideas with one another is beneficial to both services.

“No matter the operating environment, whether it’s in the High North, whether it’s at sea, whether

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Columbus AFB instructor pilots connect with Virginia Tech AFROTC cadets > U.S. Air Force > Article Display

COLUMBUS AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. (AFNS) — It’s not everyday cadets are given the opportunity to work closely with U.S. Air Force pilots; however, the Virginia Tech Air Force ROTC Detachment 875 was given the chance when instructor pilots from the 37th and 48th Flying Training Squadrons visited the university Feb. 8-11.

Nine instructor pilots, five T-6 Texan IIs, a T-1A Jayhawk, aircrew flight equipment personnel and the 14th Medical Group flight surgeon recently returned from a TDY to Roanoke Blacksburg Regional Woodrum Field, Virginia, where they connected with cadets from the Virginia Tech Air Force ROTC program.

The trip was an effort to boost rated career interest, but also added continuation training for Columbus AFB’s IPs. The pilots also helped meet Air Education and Training Command’s vision of “Recruit Next” by recruiting, training, and educating Air Force ROTC cadets on Air Force flying missions, primarily the Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training mission.

“This is an opportunity for them to see what the rated career fields are all about,” said Capt. Andrew Barstow, 37th FTS assistant chief of training. “It’s a pretty cool opportunity, not just the nature of it, but the impact as well.”

Barstow also said the experience gives cadets a better realization of what they’re getting into, and will help them make more informed decisions about their future Air Force careers.

Before the pilots began flying, they hosted a social Feb. 8, in the dorms so cadets could get to know the IPs better by asking questions about their experiences and what it’s like to be a pilot.

“Having Columbus Air Force Base come in and having guys who are current instructor pilots now gives relevancy, excitement and motivation,” said Lt. Col. Barry Burton, Virginia Tech Air Force ROTC Det. 875 commander. “It’s a hands-on actual view of

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Acting Secretary Pleased With Progress of Coalition to Defeat ISIS > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick M. Shanahan said he is pleased with the progress of the coalition to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, and he reiterated America’s steadfast support for the effort.























Shanahan spoke following a meeting of coalition defense ministers in Munich this morning.

“As a 79-member team, our coalition has taken a strong and united stand against the ISIS threat globally with a particular emphasis on Iraq and Syria,” he said. “The United States appreciates every coalition member’s unique contribution to the collective D-ISIS efforts. Together, we have eliminated the group’s hold on over 99 percent of the territory it once claimed as its so-called caliphate.”

It has not been an easy fight. Iraqi troops took Mosul back from ISIS in particularly bitter fighting. Syrian Democratic Forces wrested the ISIS capital of Raqqa back after months of fighting. The final remnants of the terror group are now under tremendous assault in the Middle Euphrates River Valley.

“We have destroyed its ability to mass forces,” Shanahan said. “We have eliminated most of its leadership and significantly diminished its resources.”

U.S. Committed to Fight

U.S. service members in northeast Syria are heading home. Still, “The United States remains committed to our coalition’s cause: The permanent defeat of ISIS both in the Middle East and beyond,” the acting secretary said. “As we make this tactical change, we remain a stabilizing force for peace in the Middle East alongside our may allies and partners.”























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Engagement With African Nations Must Matter to Americans > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article

“Africa matters.”

This is the simple, direct and crucial message that Michelle Lenihan, the acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for African affairs, wants to get across to Americans: What happens in Africa is important and affects the world.























Underlying everything on the continent is the fact that it is not a monolith. Africa is a diverse area with 54 countries and hundreds of languages. “Africa is a continent of enormous challenges and opportunities, with the possibility of moving in either direction depending on how they are managed,” Lenihan said in a recent interview.

U.S. Engagement

The United States needs to remain engaged on the continent to help the countries of the continent develop and prosper. There are more than 1 billion people on the continent. “The population is projected to more than double by 2050,” she said. “It will constitute about a quarter of the world’s population. What is also striking is that over 60 percent will be under 25 years old.”

Americans can look at this and discuss whether the glass is half full or half empty with regards to the continent. Half-full people will see massive markets and opportunities for commerce to proceed and ingenuity to flourish. Half-empty people will look at this demographic wave as a security challenge exacerbated by youth unemployment, climate trends, corruption and ungoverned or little-governed areas.

DOD’s Supporting Role

The Defense Department has a role in the continent, but it is a support role, Lenihan said. In concert with interagency partners, U.S. Africa Command is the combatant command with responsibility to implement U.S. defense strategy on the continent. “We have

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U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Professionals Explore Latest Technologies at WEST Conference 2019

SAN DIEGO (Feb. 13, 2019) Jaid Keenan, from Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Business Systems Center’s (BSC) Regional Support Site San Diego, speaks with participants of the West Coast 2019 Conference. (U.S. Navy photo by James E. Foehl/Released)

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the 29th WEST Conference in San Diego, California, where military, government and industry professionals experience the leading-edge technologies and state-of-the-art networkingcapabilities supporting the Sea Services’ operations.

Co-hosted by the U.S. Naval Institute (USNI) and the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) at the San Diego Convention Center, the theme for this year’s conference, held Feb. 13-15, is “Sharpening the Competitive Edge: Are We Ready to Compete, Deter and Win Globally?”

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SAN DIEGO, Calif. (NNS) — Commanders of the U.S. 3rd and 10th fleets have emphasized dynamic force employment at WEST 2019 conference at the San Diego Convention Center.

SAN DIEGO, Calif. (NNS) — Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) announced it will change the names of its Echelon III systems centers, SPAWAR Systems Center Atlantic in Charleston, South Carolina, and SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific in San Diego, to Naval Information Warfare Centers Atlantic and Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, respectively.

SAN DIEGO (Feb. 13, 2019) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John M. Richardson provides opening keynote remarks via teleconference from Washington Navy Yard during the West Coast 2019 Department of the Navy (DON) Information Technology (IT) Conference at the San Diego Convention Center, Feb. 13. (U.S. Navy photo by James E. Foehl/Released)

 

SAN DIEGO (Feb. 13, 2019) Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly delivers the luncheon keynote address during the Armed Forces Communication and Electronics Association-U.S. Naval Institute (AFCEA/USNI) WEST 2019. WEST brings together military and industry leaders from the sea services to share information and
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Registration open for Air University’s 4th LREC Symposium > U.S. Air Force > Article Display

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. (AFNS) — Registration is now open for Air University’s 4th annual Language, Regional Expertise and Culture Symposium.

The Air Force Culture and Language Center at Air University hosts the symposium each year providing a platform for academic exchange on topics specific to language, region and culture education in the military. The symposium is March 27-29 and the theme is “Intercultural operability.”

“Military personnel regularly face hurdles of a cultural nature when coordinating efforts at tactical, operational and strategic levels. Therefore, this year’s symposium asks participants to focus on how culture, regional expertise and language are at the heart of interoperability,” said Dr. Patricia Fogarty, AFCLC and symposium co-founder.

Scheduled speakers include Marine Corps Brig. Gen. Robert Sofge Jr., deputy commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacific; and Matthew Bogdanos, assistant district attorney for New York County and chief of U.S. Antiquities Trafficking Unit.

“The symposium brings together scholars and practitioners from across the DoD and the LREC enterprise to explore issues and initiatives that are designed to equip and prepare our Airmen for success in diverse and uncertain situations,” said Gregory Day, AFCLC director of staff.

To register and for more symposium information, visit the AFCLC website at www.airuniversity.af.edu/AFCLC/AU-LREC.

Registration deadline for attendees without a U.S. Department of Defense identification is March 1, 2019. Registration deadline for DoD-affiliated attendees is March 12, 2019.

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Hell Fighters receive heroes’ welcome 100 years ago in New York | Article

Sgt. Henry Johnson waves to well-wishers during the 369th Infantry Regiment march up Fifth Avenue in New York City on Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. Johnson was the first American to win the French military's highest honor during World War I. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem.
1 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. Henry Johnson waves to well-wishers during the 369th Infantry Regiment march up Fifth Avenue in New York City on Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. Johnson was the first American to win the French military’s highest honor during World War I. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment bandstand at rest as they wait to march up Fifth Avenue in New York City, Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem. The band was led by noted musician Lt. James Reese " Jimmie" Europe, seen at center wearing glasses.
2 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment bandstand at rest as they wait to march up Fifth Avenue in New York City, Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem. The band was led by noted musician Lt. James Reese ” Jimmie” Europe, seen at center wearing glasses. (Photo Credit: National Archives) VIEW ORIGINAL
Children wait to cheer the Soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment as they parade up Fifth Avenue in New York City on Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem.
3 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Children wait to cheer the Soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment as they parade up Fifth Avenue in New York City on Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem. (Photo Credit: National Archives) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment parade up Fifth Avenue in New York City on Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. More than 2,000 Soldiers took part in the parade up Fifth Avenue. The Soldiers marched seven miles from downtown Manhattan to Harlem.
4 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment parade up Fifth Avenue in New York City on Feb. 17, 1919, during a parade held to welcome the New York National Guard unit home. More than 2,000 Soldiers
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COPE North 2019 Strengthens Partnerships, Sharpens Lethality, Improves Interoperability > U.S. Indo-Pacific Command > 2015

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii — The United States, Japan and Australia are scheduled to participate in COPE North 2019 (CN19) at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, Feb. 18 – Mar. 8, 2019.

This long-standing exercise is designed to enhance multilateral air operations among the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, Koku Jieitai (Japan Air Self-Defense Force) and Royal Australian air force (RAAF).

More than 2,000 U.S. Airmen, Marines and Sailors will train alongside approximately 850 combined Koku Jieitai and RAAF service members. Additionally, nearly 100 U.S., Japanese and Australian aircraft from 21 flying units will participate in CN19.

The exercise will begin with a week-long humanitarian assistance and disaster relief training event that will then lead to the need for a large-force employment, all of which is designed to increase readiness among the allied nations. The exercise’s focus on humanitarian assistance and disaster relief provides critical training to U.S. and allied forces that has a direct impact on the militaries’ ability to support the region, including Palau and the Federated States of Micronesia.
Beginning in 1978 as a quarterly bilateral exercise held at Misawa Air Base, Japan, COPE North moved to Andersen AFB in 1999. Today, as U.S. Pacific Air Forces’ largest multilateral exercise, the annual event demonstrates the U.S. Air Force’s commitment to peace and security throughout the Indo-Pacific region by enabling regional forces to hone vital readiness skills critical to maintaining regional stability.

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